1888-1901 Punch Cartoonist Edward Linley Sambourne Writes to Lord Chief Justice, Sir Richard Webster

1888-1901 Punch Cartoonist Edward Linley Sambourne Writes to Lord Chief Justice, Sir Richard Webster
Click To Enlarge

Price: $325.00

Description

Description: This collection of five autograph letters signed written over a period of 13 years, 1888-1901, are from the well-known cartoonist Edward Linley Sambourne of Punch magazine to Sir Richard Webster/Viscount Alverstone, Lord Chief Justice of England. The letters suggest that the two men were acquainted socially. Two letters are invitations to dinner. Two are congratulatory, “many, many congratulations from my wife and self on the announcement I see in today’s Times. Long may you live with the added honor [and] have others added to it.” In another letter, Sambourne congratulates Sir Richard on his “acceptance of the Mastership of the Rolls [and his] being raised to the Peerage.” He wishes him a long life “to enjoy [and] adorn that excellent position.” One letter (1899) is art related and informs Webster that “[he should] have the drawing home from the reproducers tomorrow and [he would] at once have it mounted. [And] write the legend underneath and have it sent on.” He ends with regards to Mary (Sir Richard’s wife) and congratulates him “on the success of the Venezuelan arbitration.”
These letters are written on one side of approx. 8”x 6” lined, ivory stationery bearing different addresses: 18, Stafford Terrace, Kensington W., Garrick Club, W. C., and Glovers, Charlwood, Surrey and are all signed in full. Item #A01043
Edward Linley Sambourne (1844- 1910) rose to the position of Chief Cartoonist for the satirical magazine Punch, for which he worked for 43 years. His book illustrations include images for Edgar Allan Poe poems (1881) and drawings for Charles Kingsley’s Water Babies(1885). The Royal Academy exhibited his work over a 20-year period, thus paying tribute to his work. 
Sir Richard Webster (1842 -1915) was a judge and a Member of Parliament. He served as the Attorney General from 1885 to 1900. In 1900 he was created a Baronet, following which he was made the 79th Master of the Rolls, and rose to the position of Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales. When he retired in 1913, he was made the Viscount of Alverstone. One of his notable trials was the murder trial of Dr. Hawley Crippen. 
Condition: In fine condition.