1840, British Poet Samuel Rogers Writes to Edward Everett, Ambassador to Great Britain, U. S. Sec. of State

1840, British Poet Samuel Rogers Writes to Edward Everett, Ambassador to Great Britain, U. S. Sec. of State
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Description: In this April 20, 1840 letter, the “literary dictator” Samuel Rogers writes to Edward Everett, whose friendship he had cultivated through his well-known breakfast circles. We learn that Everett has returned to America, and Rogers “regrets his absence.” In his letter, Rogers expresses his longing for the far away American shores, “But how often in thought have I trodden the ground you are now treading & it gives me something of a claim to the rights of citizenship, if an affection can establish such a claim…”  He writes rather surreptitiously about a young couple they both know. Even as he praises the young man for his good looks and demeanor, he expresses concern, “Poor fellow, he has a difficult course to steer; for if he acquires any influence, he will be said to meddle, & if none, he will be despised.” On a political note, he writes, “. . . we have the Currency Question, the Opium, the Sulphur & the Boundary Questions. As to the last, it must, it shall end well--for never, never again must we be at variance with each other. Would that the debatable ground were at the bottom of the sea!”
 
He concludes with greetings from his sister and all at Holland House. In a postscript he adds, news of two other friends, Lord Brougham and the Duke of Wellington. He signs the letter, “. . . allow me to subscribe myself your much obliged & very sincere Friend, Sam Rogers.” 
 
Written on four sides of a folded 8 ⅞” x 14 ½” sheet of ivory laid paper. Item #A01141
 
Samuel Rogers (1763-1855) was a poet most known for The Pleasures of Memory (1792) and as an established conversationalist. His literary social circle included Wordsworth, Scott, Byron, and Burke among others. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in November 1796.
 
Edward Everett (1794-1865) was the 20th U. S. Secretary of State, the 15th Governor of Massachusetts, and Minister to Great Britain, 1841-45. He also taught at Harvard University and served as its president. Everett was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1820.
 
Condition: A few pinholes at intersections of folds, generally in very good condition.